Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (2022)

With every batch of new employees, regardless of their levels of experience, they will have questions about workflows within their new company – it is just the nature of things. That being said, sometimes it is the simple things that are forgotten among the growing complexity in the world of BIM.

With that in mind, while in the process of helping a junior out the other day on some Roof detailing I decided it best to refresh myself on the basics of Roof Modelling in Revit – which normally means I am going to follow with a post about the same! To that end, queue the substantial Beginners Tutorial on Creating Roofs in Revit.

So let’s get off to a good start and go from the basics – How can you Model a Roof in Revit?

In Revit there are multiple ways to approach a modelling exercise. Modelling Roofs is no different. There are 3 primary sub-tools that you can use to model roofs in Revit – Roof by Footprint, Roof by Extrusion and Roof by Face. We will delve into great detail on each later on, but to start let’s look at the standard Roof by Footprint workflow.

To model a Roof by Footprint in Revit undertake the following steps:

  1. Go to your desired Plan View to begin modelling you roof. Ideally, this should be at the same level that your roof will host to..
  2. Architecture Tab → Roof (Dropdown) → Roof by Footprint
  3. Use the draw tools panel (Sketch, Pick Lines or Pick Walls) to create your desired roof footprint.
  4. Note Boundaries show an “Angle” symbol. This means this boundary line defines part of the roof slope. You can Edit the Slope Value for each line by selecting it or turn off the slope for that boundary entirely with the “Defines Slope” option (available in the top tab or properties tab).
  5. Make sure your properties list the Roof as hosted on the correct level. You can also give an offset value if required.
  6. Click the Green Tick to Finish Edit Mode.

You’re done! Congratulations on modelling your Roof in Revit!

Needless to say, this is but a very small overview to a greater complexity of Roofs and Roof Modelling Methods that can be undertaken in Revit. The remaining content below goes on to describe each roof modelling function in detail (with examples).

It also discusses more nuanced topics such as creating overhangs and roof layouts that flex with the footprint changes of the building, tips and tricks for dealing with specific setout issues that may arise as well as a comprehensive list of how to model various common roof types from scratch in Revit.

Finally, I close the article with some quick examples of complex roof modelling to give a taste of some of the higher level features that you can go on to learn after this.

Note: I have created an accompanying video that illustrates the steps listed on this post on Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Guide. It is embedded below if that is your preferred learning format.I suggest you make a cup of tea or coffee as it is decently long and detailed. Enjoy!

If not, proceed passed the video for a more linear, step by step breakdown of the Processes involved in creating various roof types in Revit as well as a number of tips and tricks scattered throughout.

Table of Contents

Creating a Roof in Revit – Roof by Footprint

  1. Go to your desired Plan View to begin modelling you roof. This view should ideally have been generated from the Level that will act as the Host or Base Level for your new Roof construction.
  2. Next, Navigate to the Architecture Tab → Roof (Dropdown) → Roof by Footprint, as per the image below.
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (1)
  1. Use the draw tools panel (Sketch, Pick Lines or Pick Walls) to create your desired roof footprint.You can see in the image below that we opted for the Rectangular Sketch tool.
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  1. Note Boundaries show an “Angle” symbol. This means this boundary line defines part of the roof slope. You can Edit the Slope Value for each line by selecting it or turn off the slope for that boundary entirely with the “Defines Slope” option (available in the top tab or properties tab).
  2. Make sure to include the Overhang that you require so you have the correct offset value for your roof value when drawing relative to your building’s walls.
  3. Make sure your properties list the Roof as hosted on the correct level. You can also give an offset value if required.
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  1. Click the Green Tick to Finish Edit Mode.You Have completed the Modelling of a basic Hip Roof in Revit.
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Creating a Roof in Revit – Roof By Extrusion

Let’s say that you don’t want a Hip Roof, but are in need of a Gable Roof instead. There are two ways to easily do this in Revit. The first is to use the Roof by Footprint as we have previously done and alter some of the boundary line properties so the roof falls only make a Gable – This will be broken down in more detail in the next section, called “Controlling and Editing Roof Slopes in Revit”.

Another way of Creating the Gable Roof type in Revit is to use the Roof by Extrusion Tool. The steps to model a Roof by Extrusion in Revit are as Follows:

(Video) Creating Roofs in Revit: A Monster Beginners Tutorial

  1. First, we need to Navigate to the Roof By Extrusion Tool. To do this, go to Architecture Tab → Roof (Dropdown) → Roof by Extrusion
  2. Once you are in Roof by Extrusion, a Dialogue Window will open. This will prompt you to select a Reference Plane or Geometric Plane (such as a Wall Face) that the Roof will be extruded out Perpendicularly from. Select Pick a Plane
  3. Next, in a 3D view, Click on the plane you want to use. In the example I opted for the wall face.
  4. Now, the Drafting toolset will open – you can begin to draw the shape of the roof profile that you wish to extrude. To create the Gable in the example, I drew a temporary line up from the Midpoint of the wall. From the Apex, I then drew one of the Roof Falls at the desired Pitch. Next, I used MM (Mirror Axis) to mirror the first fall across the Centreline to form the profile line for the other side of the Gable Roof. Finally, I deleted the initial midline and finished the sketch via the Green Tick button.
  5. Finally, we can control the depth of the Extrusion via the values in the Property Bar as per the image below, or using the Draggable Arrows at either end if there is no need to be as exact. Using the Align Tool (AL) can also be a good method to align the depth of the Extruded Roof to a known object face.
  6. You can now attach the Walls to the Roof by selecting the walls and using the Attached/Detach button that appears in the top toolbar, then selecting the roof.
  7. You should now have completed your Roof by Extrusion Gable Roof in Revit
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (5)

Controlling and Editing Roof Slopes in Revit

Controlling and Editing the roof pitch in Revit is a very straightforward process. To begin with, note that the method discussed is only applicable to Roofs that have been modelled as a Roof by Footprint. Other Methods, such as Roof by Extrusion or Roof by Face rely on either a sketch based section profile extended a designated length or a surface to have already been generated by another modelling method that a Roof can be hosted onto.

In order to describe how to control and edit roof Falls of your Roof by Footprint models, I will discuss the creation of three typical roof types, which will all be generated by changing just a few slope properties from the same Roof by Footprint Sketch → A Flat Roof, a Hip Roof and a Gable Roof type.

Flat Roof in Revit -This one is very straightforward. When in the Roof by Footprint sketch mode, select all of your newly created boundaries and turn off the Defines Slope parameter. Finish the Sketch by pressing the Green Tick and you will not have a completely flat roof surface in your Revit model. See the gif below which converts a typical hip roof to a flat roof in the Revit sample model within seconds.

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (6)

Gable Roof in Revit:

Previously we discussed how you can model a Gable Roof type via the Roof by Extension tool. Truth be told, I would recommend Roof by Footprint to create a gable roof first as it gives you a greater level of control should you need to make any edits to the roof later in the project timeline. In the GIF below, the Flat Roof was previously created and turned into a Gable Roof model.

To do this, Edit the Roof . Then, select the two long boundary lines only and turn on the Defines Slope parameter. You can also change the value of the roof slope of your boundaries in the properties tab. Finish your sketch and you should now have a Gable Roof Shape. For completeness, make sure to select the walls below and use the Attach/Detach option to have the walls meet the u/s of your roof geometry.

The Gif below outlines this full process.

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (7)

Hip Roof in Revit:

You guessed it, to create the hip roof type from out Roof by Footprint sketch you merely have to edit the sketch again and select your two remaining boundaries, then ensure the Defines Slope parameter is active for them.See below:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (8)

Note – as a default, your Roof will have a slope of 30 degrees on all boundaries and form a Hip roof unless you change the slope designation in the sketch mode per boundary line.

Creating and Editing your Roof Construction Assembly

Take from a simple simple placeholder and build out a Soprema style Membrane Roof.

Here we can discuss the creation of your roof construction assembly so that you sections can illustrate the correct material specifications of your roof. Note that while our example uses a roof that has already been modelled, the following steps can be undertaken prior to beginning your roof model sketches.

In order to create your new roof construction assembly in Revit, select the previously modelled roof. In the Properties Toolbar, under Type Properties select Duplicate. Give your Duplicate Roof a suitable name descriptor.

Under Construction, go to the Edit menu as shown in the image below. Once the Edit dialogue is open, you can begin to edit the structural assembly of the floor. You can build your assembly as you require – one best practice to be aware of is to always try to maintain the Core Boundary of the Assembly as the structural / bearing elements, and have your thermal, weathering and finishes materials on either side of the Core Boundary. I also recommend having the Preview Tab expanded and set to a section view so you can see the alterations of your assembly alterations in real time

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (9)

To add assembly items, select Insert and you will see another assembly item add to the list. This may be above or below the original Roof element but you can easily move the order around by using the Up and Down buttons.

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (10)

When inserting new assembly items, you can alter the Function of the new items by changing the properties within the Function Column.

(Video) Create Roof Fascias, Soffits, Gutters and Downpipes in Revit

See below for our finalised Construction Assembly, Later on in this post I will discuss how you can have certain items within the assembly (such as the Insulation Layer) to a fall while the remaining assembly remains flat (for example, to create roof drainage falls).

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (11)

How to Create Slight Drainage Falls on a Flat Roof in Revit

The simplest way to generate a slight drainage slope on a Flat Roof in Revit is via the shape editing tool called Modify Sub Elements. To use this, do the following:

  1. Select your Flat Roof
  2. Press the Modify Sub Elements button that appears.
  3. Add Point (or Split line if better suited – Creates points at intersections)
  4. Place your new points as required.
  5. Use the Modify Sub Elements button to select your newly placed points.
  6. Assign an elevation value to the points to create the slight roof falls.
  7. Done!
  • Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (12)
  • Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (13)

You can also restore your completely flat roof by using the Reset Shape tool, which will remove any of the edits that were created in the Modify Sub Elements dialogue.

How to Slope Roof Insulation only in Revit

The best way to model a slope in your Roof Insulation Layer only is to assign the Insulation Materials as Variable in the Construction Assembly. Here is how to assign a variable material in Revit:

  1. Select your Roof, Edit Type and select Construction
  2. Find the Insulation assembly item. On the right hand side, activate the Variable check box.
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (14)
  1. Done!
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The base of your Roof should now be flat and the roof falls should only be present in your insulation air (visible in section views). One thing to note, your insulation layer has to be sufficiently deep to account for the full height of the roof falls.

Why you should use “Select Wall” drawing option when creating a Roof by Footprint

Model Roof Overhangs by using the wall selection tool.

Using the Wall selection tool allows your roof to maintain the proposed overhang value and updates the roof shape as the walls below expand or contract. This is a very straightforward process:

  1. Go to Architecture Tab → Roof by Footprint
  2. In the Sketch Mode, click the Select Walls drawing tool.
  3. You will see an overhang option appear across the top toolbar. Assign your desired overhang value (500mm was used in our example)
  4. Finish your Roof sketch by clicking the Green Tick.

You have now created your roof model with the required overhang values in place. What is nice about this method is that the roof boundary is pinned to the walls, meaning an update to the setout of the walls will automatically update the roof geometry, while also maintaining the overhang value that has been designated. Pretty nifty!

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How to Place Openings through a Roof in Revit

Adding Vertical openings to your roof in Revit is a very straightforward affair. There are two primary types of openings that are used in the majority of roof modelling exercises in Revit, which are Vertical Opening and Opening by Face. The difference between them is really quite straightforward.

Vertical Openings cut a vertical opening straight through the roof you have selected. The roof opening cut will always retain a vertical orientation.

Opening by Face is a little more nuanced but still very simple – you select an single sloped plane of your roof model and then using the sketch tools mark out your desired opening. The roof opening cut in this instance will always be perpendicular to the roof fall/plane it was assigned to. This is great because your roof pitch can be altered but the cut will update to remain perpendicular to the new roof pitch.

To create a Vertical Opening through your Roof, go to the Architecture Tab – Opening – Vertical. You will then be prompted to select your object, to which you should select your roof model. Then, the drawing tools will appear. Use the drawing tools in whatever plan, elevation or section view best describes your ope size requirement and draw the boundary sketch for your Vertical Opening. Finish the sketch by pressing the Green Tick. You will now have an opening that cuts vertically through your roof, as shown in the image below.

The process to Create an Opening By Face through your Roof is nearly identical. Start by going to the Architecture Tab – Opening – Opening by Face. When prompted to select your object, hover over your roof and just select the roof pitch that you want the opening to cut through. As before, use the Drawing tools to sketch the Boundary of your proposed roof opening. Finish by selecting the Green Tick. You will now have an opening that cuts perpendicular to the pitch it was assigned to, as per the image below:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (17)

How to Model a Dormer Roof in Revit

To Create a Dormer Roof, we first need to start with the smaller roof portion of the dormer. You can model this in any of the 3 primary roof modelling methods, but in the example I have opted to use the Roof by Extrusion tool.

  1. First, a work plane needs to be decided upon. You can create a Reference Plane if required by pressing “RP” but in the example I have opted to use the leading edge of the primary roofs fascia line. To select your workplane, first select Roof by Extrusion, and you will be prompted to pick a plane as shown below.
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (18)
  1. Once you have manually selected your plane, you need to select the reference level and offset. We used the Roof Level with an offset of 0 in our example.
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  1. Once the Plane and Reference Level information is set we can use the draw tools in the top toolbar to draw our roof by extrusion profile.
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (20)
(Video) Intelligent Parapet, Roof & Gutter Modelling in Revit
  1. Once the roof profile sketch is completed you should be left with your Dormer Roof. You will likely notice that the extents of the roof extrusion are not what you require. The dormer extrusion extents can be edited in the Properties Bar as shown:
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  1. The Roof portion of the dormer still remains incomplete. To connect the Dormer Roof to the Main Roof use the Join/Unjoin Roof command, which can be found in the Modify Tab. To use this correctly, select the edge of the Dormer Roof that needs to extend to the main Roof. Then, select the roof plane that the Dormer should join with. Viola, the Roof portion of the Dormer is now complete!
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (22)
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (23)
  1. The next step is to place the dormer walls. To do this, navigate to the Architecture Tab → Walls (WA). In the example I set the dormer walls base to be at the Eaves level and the top of the wall was set at Eaves Level +1500mm offset. What you require may vary. Once the walls are complete, use the Attach/Detach option that appears when the walls are selected and join the top of the walls to the Dormer Roof above. You will be left with something akin to this:
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  1. Finally, the Dormer footprint has to be cut from the Main Roof. To cut the new dormer out of the main roof, go to the Architecture Tab → Dormer (opening). This will bring up the Pick Roof/Wall Lines tool that allows you to select the outside face of your new Dormer construction like below.
Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (25)
  1. Finally, use the Trim/Extend (TR) command to neaten your Dormer Opening Lines. Finish the sketch by selecting the Green Tick. You have completed a Dormer roof in Revit!
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How to Resolve an Awkward Gable Recess on a Wall Return in Revit

Sometimes you may have a large Gable Roof that covers the main portion of the building but also continues out over a smaller annexe to the building, where one of the walls is a continuation of the larger building footprints elevation. This leaves an awkward recess where you need to tell just a portion of the smaller roofs gable to tuck back under the larger section of the roof, even though they are a single model element.

To solve this, you need to tell the small segment of return wall to stick to the underside of the roof via the Attach/Detach tool. Next, you need to use the Join/Unjoin Roof tool (Found in the modify tab) and select the internal edge of the roof that you want to tuck under the main roof – then select the wall you want it to extend to. The Roof edge should tuck in under the larger gable to meet the face of the return wall. You can now detach your wall if desired and the roof edge will remain in the same position. If needed, you can proceed to edit the wall profile to neaten the entire relationship. See complete workflow GIF below:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (27)

Trust me on this – the tip above is not commonly known and without it the solution always ends up being some sort of janky additional roof extrusion or similar put in place to close the gap. It’s an absolute timesaver, so I hope it helps you guys out!

How to Model Multiple Common Roof Styles in Revit:

How to Model a Gambrel Barn Style Roof in Revit

Best way to approach a Gambrel Style Roof in Revit is by using the Roof by Extrusion tool.

  1. As before, select roof by extrusion, pick your plane and assign your reference level.
  2. Draw one half of your Gambrel Roof Profile, working from the roof midpoint (ridgeline) out towards the Eaves.
  3. Mirror your half roof over to the reverse side (MM is the shortcut for Mirror Axis)
  4. Complete Sketch when Profile is complete.
  5. Alter Extrusion Start and End Values in the properties bar to control the overall extrusion depth. Alternatively, you can use the Drag Arrows or align tool for the same.

Finished! You should have something similar to the following:

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How to Model a Lean To Roof in Revit

The best way to model a Lean to Roof in Revit is to use the Roof by Footprint tool.

  1. Select Roof by Footprint for the Architectural Tab.
  2. Draw your Roof Boundary
  3. Select all but one boundary and turn off defines slope parameter.
  4. Finish Sketch

You should be left with a Lean To Roof with just a single Fall, similar to the following:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (29)

How to Model a Butterfly Roof in Revit

The way I approach a butterfly style roof is via the Roof by Extrusion tool. Much the same as the earlier Gable that was generated as an extrusion, the process goes as follows:

  1. Select Roof by Extrusion
  2. Pick your Plane and Reference Level
  3. Draw your Butterfly Roof (Draw from Wall midpoint out in one direction, then mirror across to the other side.
  4. Finish Sketch
  5. Control Extrusion Extents in in the Properties Bar
  6. Attach walls to underside of Roof.

Your Butterfly roof should be similar to this once the above steps are followed through:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (30)

How to Model a Catslide Gable in Revit

The way to model a Catslide Gable in Revit is much the same as as standard Gable.

  1. Start by selecting the Roof by Footprint Tool
  2. Draw your desired Boundary
  3. Select all boundary lines and turn off defines slope
  4. Select the leading edge boundary from your building protrusion and the boundary on the opposite side of the Roof – turn on defines slope for these two boundary lines.

You should be left with a finished roof such as the following – make sure to attach your walls to the underside of your roof once the roof geometry is complete.

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (31)
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How to Model a Dual Hip Roof in Revit

Dual Hip roof is modelled exactly like a standard Hip Roof in Revit. Merely create your Roof by footprint, give the boundary lines the required slopes and finish your sketch. The completed roof will be akin to this:

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (32)

How to Model a Jerkinhead Half Hip Roof in Revit

To create a half hip roof / Jerkinhead style roof in Revit, you need to first create a standard HIP Roof which was outlined previously. Once you have created a standard hip roof, follow these steps to convert it to a Half Hip / Jerkinhead Style Roof:

  1. Create 2 Reference Planes (RP) Perpendicular to the sides of the building that you want to apply the Half Hip. Make sure that the Reference Planes are Equidistant from the Midline of the roof.
  2. Select the Hip Roof and Edit Boundary
  3. Use the Split Element tool in the Modify tab (SL) and split the boundary lines where they intersect with the Reference Planes.
  4. Select the small remaining segments of the roof boundaries which were split at the corners (on the eaves side of the Reference Planes) and make sure the defines slope property is off.
  5. Finish the Sketch.

You should now have a Jerkinhead / Half Hip style roof fully modelled in Revit, similar to the below.

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How to Model a Clerestory Roof in Revit

The Raised Clerestory Roof modelling method in Revit is very straightforward. It is merely a combination of two previously covered methods – Two low level Lean To Roofs and one High level Gable, with walls rising to the underside of all three roofs.

Creating Roofs in Revit – A Monster Beginners Tutorial – 8020 BIM (34)

How to Model a Dutch Gable Roof in Revit

The Dutch Gable is a combination of a Hip Roof with a Higher Level Gable Roof, both of which have been covered previously. The one thing to note when modelling a Dutch Gable Roof in Revit is to Create an internal set of boundary lines to match the size of the higher level gable that will be above. Then, to make sure these inner boundaries have the define slope property turned off – this will create a Hip Roof with a void in the Center which forms the “skirt” of the Dutch Gable style correctly.

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How to Create Complex Roofs in Revit with the Roof by Face Command

The simplest way to start introducing Complex Roofs into your Revit Model is by using the Rofo by Face tool. There is very little to describe here but I will give a brief overview of the workflow.

  1. Create your desired complex roof surface using Massing Tools. (I will soon have a tutorial on Massing in Revit which I will link to from here in a future update)
  2. Select the Roof by Face tool.
  3. Click on the Massed Surface you previously created.
  4. Done

I appreciate the above is a little, well, sparse. Truth be told there are a lot of variables in this scenario but not alot of fluctuation in how you will approach it. Anyway, for the sake of completeness, here are two non-standard roof styles that I quickly generated with the Roof by Face command.

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List of Future Revit Roof Tutorials:

Here is a Brief overview of some of the Roof Centric Revit tutorials that will be coming to the 8020 BIM Blog and YouTube channel in the foreseeable future:

  1. How to Model Complex Roofs in Revit – Detailed Examples
  2. How to Start Parametric Roof Design in Revit
  3. How to Create and Detail Panelled Roof types in Revit
  4. How to Model Timber Roof Structure in Revit
  5. How to Create Roof Details in Revit – Detailed examples
  6. 10 Revit Roof Tips you may not know.

That concludes this comprehensive beginners tutorial on how to model Roofs in Revit. If you have any comments or suggestions on the above please leave them down below and I will continue to develop this post over time.

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FAQs

How do you make a simple roof in Revit? ›

Revit - How to draw a Roof by Footprint - YouTube

How do I add a roof in Revit 2022? ›

Click Architecture tab Roof drop-down (Roof by Footprint). On the Draw panel, click (Pick Walls).
...
In the drawing area, do the following:
  1. Highlight an exterior wall.
  2. Press Tab to select the chain of walls.
  3. Click to place the roof lines.
  4. On the Mode panel, click (Finish).
Sep 21, 2021

How do you make different roofs in Revit? ›

10 Common Roof Shapes Modeld in Revit Tutorial - YouTube

How do I create a roof in assembly in Revit? ›

Roof Construction Elements in Revit Tutorial - YouTube

How do you draw a roof in Revit 2021? ›

Draw a flat roof: On the Properties palette, set the Underlay value to 01 - Store Floor. Click Architecture tab Roof drop-down (Roof by Footprint).
...
Draw the Roof
  1. Highlight an exterior wall.
  2. Press Tab to select the chain of walls.
  3. Click to place the roof lines.
  4. On the Mode panel, click (Finish).
Jul 29, 2021

How do you make a roof in Revit 2021? ›

9 Tips To Understand Revit Roofs - YouTube

How do you make a lean to roof in Revit? ›

Revit Tutorial - Shed Roof High Eave Detail - YouTube

How do you join roofs in Revit? ›

Click Modify tab Geometry panel (Join/Unjoin Roof). Select an edge of the roof that you want to join, and then select the wall or roof to which you want to join the roof.

How do you make a flat roof with a parapet in Revit? ›

Flat roof and Parapet sweep - YouTube

How do you make a modern roof in Revit? ›

Revit Roof Tip #1 - Remove Slope To Create Flat Roof - YouTube

How do you make a butterfly roof? ›

DIY Tiny House Butterfly Roof Construction - YouTube

How do you model roof trusses in Revit? ›

Truss in Revit Tutorial - YouTube

How do you make a flat roof in Revit? ›

Flat Roof Solution in Revit Tutorial - Flat Roof Slope in Revit - YouTube

How do you model roof rafters in Revit? ›

Wood/Timber Roof Construction in Revit Tutorial - YouTube

How do you make a shed roof in Revit? ›

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